Helping Preserve the Glossy Black-Cockatoo

Greenfleet worked with the Yugambeh people, a co-operative of eight Aboriginal clans, to help heal the land and preserve the native wildlife at Minjelha Dhagun.

Greenfleet’s tree planting is important for us as the new forest is helping us to heal our land. The new trees are sustaining the lives of the wildlife which in turn is helping our people to reconnect to our land and our culture,” said Robyn Currie, President of Yugambeh Land Enterprises Ltd.

Bordering the planting site is Mt Barney National Park, a key habitat for the Glossy Black-Cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus lathami), one of the most threatened species of cockatoo in Australia which are listed as vulnerable under QLD and NSW legislation and as threatened in Victoria1.

Since European colonisation, a major threat to the survival of the glossy black-cockatoo is habitat loss - the clearing of casuarina trees in woodland areas, and the loss of mature eucalypts for nest hollows2.

Greenfleet and the Yugambeh people included Forest She-oak (Allocasuarina torulosa) in the planting to provide crucial habitat for the Glossy Black.

Glossy Black-Cockatoos are notoriously fussy eaters with their diet exclusively consisting of seeds from she-oak species. We’ve included several hundred Forest She-oak trees in the planting mix as important feeding resources and the gums will eventually provide shelter.

We hope that the restoration of such vital habitat for the Glossy Black-Cockatoo will help conserve the species and prevent it from becoming endangered.

The plantings at Minjelha Dhagun started out as ten-centimetre seedlings in 2008. Four years later many of the trees are over three metres - some reaching five metres. Greenfleet Senior Forester pointed out that the plantings benefited from the end of the decade-long drought in much of eastern
Australia and the forest’s growth has been very impressive.

The seedlings have responded to a couple of relatively wet years and are now well established. Being next to the national park has also helped, with several understorey species establishing across the fence. This all builds on the biodiversity importance and integrity of the site, and to its cultural value to the traditional owners”, Scott Hunter, property manager, explained.

 

Click here to read more about Greenfleet's native revegetation at Minjelha Dhagun.

 

 1 Source: The Glossy Black Conservancy (www.glossyblack.org.au)
2 Source: NSW Office of Environment and Heritage (www.environment.nsw.gov.au/animals/GlossyBlackCockatoos.htm)

Photo of Michael and Scott looking up a Greenfleet tree at Minjelha Dhagun with Mt Barney in the background © Wayne Johnston
Photo of Michael and Scott looking up a Greenfleet tree at Minjelha Dhagun
with Mt Barney in the background © Wayne Johnston


Photo of a Glossy Black-Cockatoo feeding on a She-oak in Qld - ©George Gornacz
Photo of a Glossy Black Cockatoo kindly shared by the Glossy Black Conservancy.
© George Gornacz

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